Strabismus

What is Strabismus?

Strabismus is a medical term used when the eyes are not properly aligned with each other. The eye muscles don’t work together, so each eye appears to be looking at a different point. As a result, it could affect depth perception and it can reduce the total field of vision. Often the turned eye develops amblyopia.

How is it Diagnosed?

A child can be checked by an optometrist at any age to see whether his or her eyes are properly aligned with one another. Normally a parent, family doctor or a paediatrician will spot it. If a family member has had strabismus it is more likely that your child will have it. If there is a family history of eye disease it is a good reason to have your child’s eyes examined early. It is not a condition that one will eventually outgrow.

How is Strabismus treated?

It is important to seek professional advice as soon as possible as the results of treatment can be excellent. How much your child’s vision improves depends on how quickly treatment was started and at what age. If treatment is delayed too long it may not be possible to restore your child’s vision completely. There are numerous options to treat strabismus. Treating strabismus in a child can be as simple as prescribing the appropriate pair of glasses or as complicated as requiring invasive eye muscle surgery most often performed with general anesthesia. The goal of strabismus treatment is to realign the eyes so that the brain can see singly and also develop the connections necessary for depth perception or 3D vision